MMDS can be used to copy bitmapped images of molecules or reactions onto the clipboard. Other iOS apps, such as Keynote, can paste the graphical content into their own documents. This allows MMDS to be used to create graphics for mobile office productivity apps.

Overview

Copying Images

From the Main Menu

From the Button Bank

Using Images

Keynote

Summary

Overview


The iOS clipboard (also known as the "pasteboard") is usually used to store arbitrary text content, but it can conveniently handle bitmapped images. The list of apps that can read an image from the clipboard is growing, and includes quite notably the iPad counterparts of the iWork suite: Keynote and Pages.

Copying Images


From the Main Menu


To copy a molecule or reaction image to the clipboard from the main menu, press-and-hold on the structure icon until the menu pops up. Select the Interoperability item, then from the submenu, select Copy Image:

The bitmapped image will be generated and copied onto the clipboard.

From the Button Bank


When editing a molecule or reaction, or showing the detail view for a datasheet, the Interoperability bank can be used to achieve the same effect:

When selected within the molecule or reaction editing panels, the current subject will be used as the basis for an image. When viewing a datasheet, a row must be selected. The molecule or reaction on that row will be used for the image.

Using Images


In order to be as useful as possible, the generated image selects a relatively high resolution. The default sizing uses approximately 100 pixels for each bond length unit, reduced if necessary if the overall area is more than a million pixels. The images are are created with a transparent background, and use anti-aliasing to achieve a high quality visual appearance.

Nonetheless, the image is still a bitmapped grid of discrete pixels, which means that if it is expanded too far, its quality will eventually degrade. Images created in this way are very suitable for any kind of screen display, and are ideal for presentations intended for display on a projector. When used to produce hardcopy, the results can vary. Colour printers may achieve reasonable results, e.g. using for a small graphical portion of a poster, but results with black-and-white printers will often produce suboptimal results. Using bitmapped images generated in this way is not recommended for printed publications. When producing graphics for submission scientific journals, it is usually a better idea to produce vector graphics, which must be done by other means.

Bitmaps that are created at a resolution too low for their intended scale produce very poor results. High resolution bitmaps are indistiguishable from the ideal result, as long as their scale is comparable to the resolution of the device that is their final destination. For most purposes, the graphic produced by using MMDS to copy an image to the clipboard can be considered as a medium-to-high resolution bitmap.

Keynote


First, copy an image of a molecular structure using MMDS. Then open the Keynote app, and create a new slide. Tap an empty area of the screen, to bring up a context menu which offers the Paste option:

Paste the image into the slide, which will create a new graphic object:

To generate diagrams of reactions, the process is analogous. Note also that when MMDS is configured to use colour coding for structures, this setting is honoured for generation of images:

Summary


MMDS has a number of ways of exporting data from the mobile device, but it can also be used to create graphics for use on the device itself. Bitmapped images can be easily copied onto the clipboard and used within other apps. The images are generated with sufficient resolution to be rendered in high quality on any screen-based presentation tool.

See Also


Demonstration Videos, Mobile Molecular DataSheet (iOS), Products